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Tuesday, July 7, 2020 | History

5 edition of Working with abused and neglected elders in minority populations found in the catalog.

Working with abused and neglected elders in minority populations

Working with abused and neglected elders in minority populations

a synthesis of research

  • 159 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by National Aging Resource Center on Elder Abuse in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Abused aged -- Services for -- United States,
  • Minority aged -- Services for -- United States,
  • Minority aged -- Abuse of -- United States,
  • Social case work with older people -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    StatementKaren F. Stein
    ContributionsNational Aging Resource Center on Elder Abuse (U.S.), United States. Administration on Aging
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination32 p.
    Number of Pages32
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13617935M
    OCLC/WorldCa32251260

    Spouses of elders were the second largest group What are the 7 most common types of elder abuse? physical, sexual, emotional or psychological, neglect, abandonment, financial or . About This Quiz & Worksheet. What is elder abuse and in what ways is it manifested? The quiz/worksheet combo for this lesson will test your understanding of the aspects of this behavior.

    The AoA is a wonderful resource for elders who want to know their legal rights or are concerned that they are not being treated fairly. If you go to their website, the AoA has a full list of services and resources on their ‘Help and Resources’ that will give you a wealth of information on the different kinds of social services to which you.   Sometimes it's obvious that elder abuse is taking place. However, in many cases, it isn't so easy to recognize abuse or neglect by others. Signs and symptoms can often mirror or get obscured by existing medical conditions, or they can be hidden by the efforts of devious perpetrators.

    - Work with elders and providers of services to minority persons to facilitate infonnation exchange, close service gaps and solve specific problems. --Include minority elders in program planning and decision-making at the agency. 2) Jn particular, one-to-one advocacy and outreach are critical access services for minority elders. In problem-solving for elders, their care providers and family members should be ever mindful of general demographic trends for the elderly and make themselves aware of their elder’s specific wishes. Generally, when their life and care needs must be addressed, most elders want to remain in their home where they are most comfortable.


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Working with abused and neglected elders in minority populations Download PDF EPUB FB2

Working with abused and neglected elders in minority populations [microform]: a synthesis of research / Karen F. Stein National Aging Resource Center on Elder Abuse Washington, D.C Australian/Harvard Citation. Stein, Karen F. & National Aging Resource Center on Elder Abuse (U.S.).

& United States. Administration on Aging. Get this from a library. Working with abused and neglected elders in minority populations: a synthesis of research. [Karen F Stein; National Aging Resource Center on Elder Abuse (U.S.)]. Understanding Elder Abuse in Minority Populations is an especially valuable and unique contribution to the field because most of the chapters are written by minority researchers and based upon studies within their own indigenous communities across the United States.

Major sections of the book deal with specific racial/ethnic populations: African American, Hispanic, Asian American, and Native. Author(s): Stein,Karen F; National Aging Resource Center on Elder Abuse (U.S.) Title(s): Working with abused and neglected elders in minority populations: a synthesis of research[microform] / Karen F.

Stein. Country of Publication: United States Publisher: Washington, D.C.: National Aging Resource Center on Elder Abuse, [] Description. Page - Neglect may also include failure of a person who has fiduciary responsibilities to provide care for an elder (eg, pay for necessary home care service) or the failure on the part of an in-home service provider to provide necessary care.

Neglect typically means the refusal or failure to provide an elderly person with such life necessities as food, water, clothing, shelter, personal. Conservative estimates put the number of elders who have been injured, exploited, or otherwise mistreated at about 1 to 2 million; however, studies suggest that only 1 in 14 domestic elder abuse.

Abuse of elders takes many different forms, some involving intimidation or threats against the elderly, some involving neglect, and others involving financial trickery.

The most common are: Physical elder abuse – The non-accidental use of force against an elderly person that. Yet, during the last 20 years fewer than 50 articles have addressed the shameful problem that abusers—and sometimes the abused themselves—want to conceal.

Elder Mistreatment in an Aging America takes a giant step toward broadening our understanding of the mistreatment of the elderly and recommends specific research and funding strategies.

One study of more than 2, elders found that those who were abused or neglected were three times more likely than those who were not mistreated to die during the next thirteen years.

This difference was found even after injury and chronic illness were taken into account (Horn, ). Horn, D. (, August 17). Bad news on elder abuse.

Time. The mistreatment of older people can take many forms, including physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, financial exploitation, and neglect.

Though as many as 1 in 10 older people are abused each year, a majority of cases go unreported for many reasons, including a lack of social supports needed to make reporting easier. What We Can Do. Elder abuse is a significant public health problem.

Each year, hundreds of thousands of adults over the age of 60 are abused, neglected, or financially exploited. Elder abuse, including neglect and exploitation, is experienced by 1 out of every 10 people, ages 60 and older, who live at home.

Understanding elder abuse in minority populations. Philadelphia, PA: Brunner/Mazel; pp. – Nerenberg L, Baldridge D. Preventing and responding to abuse of elders in Indian Country. Washington, DC: National Indian Council on Aging for the National Center of Elder Abuse; a.

AP Nerenberg L, Baldridge D. While there is currently no federal law protecting elders from abuse, all 50 states have passed laws specifically dealing with elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation. Laws and definitions of terms may vary from one state to another. Those working with elders who have been abused or neglected must rely on forensic markers.

The problem with this approach is that caregivers, Adult Protective Services agencies, and doctors are often not trained to distinguish between injuries caused by mistreatment and those that are the result of accident, illness, or aging.

Specifically, we compare self-neglecting elders and those abused and/or neglected by others. Of the latter, we further compare risk factors for physical and emotional/psychological abuse and/or neglect with risk factors for financial exploitation only.

The risk factors analyzed include elders' gender, age, living arrangement, acute or chronic. addressing the suicide risk of abused and neglected elders must be added to and certain minority populations.

The primary precipitating factors for homicides and suicides were intimate partner. Elders who have been physically abused should be taken to a hospital for treatment and should not go back to living with the caregiver or spouse who abused them. Physical abuse is inexcusable in every way.

A study found that 21% of nursing home residents were neglected at least once over a month period. Subsequently, elderly individuals are at a high risk of being abused.

Studies show that the abuse of the elderly has an impact on the health and well-being of elders and can lead to increased. Major sections of the book deal with specific racial\/ethnic populations: African American, Hispanic, Asian American, and Native American.

The book concludes with discussions of the overall impact of elder abuse on all populations, culturally specific outreach programs, and a synthesis of current knowledge on minority elder abuse. Older adults still deserve dignity and respect, so if you believe that a senior is being abused, do not be reluctant to report and stop the abuse, and get the abuser the help they need.

If you believe your senior or something you know is experiencing elder abuse please call immediately or. Older people today are more visible, more active and more independent than ever before.

They are living longer and are in better health. But as the population of older Americans grows, so does the hidden problem of elder abuse, exploitation and neglect.Children with disabilities, in particular, have a higher risk of being abused or neglected.

According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services, 11 percent of all child abuse victims in had a physical, cognitive and/or behavioral disability and children with disabilities are almost two times more likely to be physically.Currently, there are no official national statistics relating to the prevalence of this dilemma.

However, current research estimates that approximately 1 to 2 million Americans, age 65 or older have been abused or neglected by the very people they entrust with their care and protection (National Center on Elder Abuse, ).